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tastefullyoffensive:

Spotted in Burlington, Washington. [x]

tastefullyoffensive:

Spotted in Burlington, Washington. [x]

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carlosofthecosmos:

carlosofthecosmos:

unimpressed2chainz:

samuel l. jackson is so adorable on twitter look at these old ppl selfies 

I can’t fucking breathe holy moly

I wanna take all my selfies like the one on the right. I wanna channel this energy all the time

How is he so cute?

(via martinfreeman)

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neurosciencestuff:

Schizophrenia: What’s in my head?

When she’s experiencing hallucinations, artist Sue Morgan feels compelled to draw; to ‘get it out of her head’. Sue was diagnosed with schizophrenia about 20 years ago. The drawing is therapeutic, but it’s also Sue’s way of expressing the complex and sometimes frightening secret world in her head. In this film Sue meets Sukhi Shergill, a clinician and researcher at the Institute of Psychiatry in London. He’s also making pictures, but using MRI to peer inside the brains of schizophrenia patients.

Read more about schizophrenia

(via cognitivedissonance)

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lonelyy-depressed-girl:

if I offered you $20, would you take it?

How about if I crumpled it up?

Stepped on it?

you would probably take it even though it was crumpled and stepped on it. Do you know why?

Because it is still $20, and its worth has not changed.

The same goes for you; if you have a bad day, or if something bad happens to you, you are not worthless.

if someone crumples you up or steps on you, your worth does not change. You are still just as valuable as you were before.

(via impromptuonedykedanceparty)

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sucysucyfivedolla:

Social Justice Warrior?? okay but we’re gonna need a Social Justice Thief and a Social Justice Cleric cuz I’m a Social Justice Witch and don’t have party heals. Might need a Social Justice Paladin if the war isn’t specced into defense plus maybe another Social Justice DPS to round the party out

(via sunny-burn)

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underunderstood:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

This is an important event in history, especially Canadian and feminist history. So I’m going to tell you more about it.
1) The shooter had been rejected from Ecole Polytechnique prior to the shooting. He blamed this on these female students, claiming that they were feminists who ruined his life.
2) In the first classroom he entered, he demanded the men leave before shooting at the women. No man attempted to stop him as they left. Take that as you will. (Later on, several men did get injured trying to stop him in the hallways.)
3) In his suicide letter, he believed that feminists were attempting to be more powerful than men, and were trying to take men’s rights away.4) Feminists were actually blamed by some for the massacre. The line of logic was “if feminists didn’t make women’s rights an issue, Levine wouldn’t have wanted to kill feminists!” Victim blaming at its finest.
5) The mainstream news media often did not publicize the outrage from women’s groups, and often preferred those who took a calm approach. Ironic, that.
6) Despite him literally having a hit list of feminist icons in his final letter, several newscasters questioned whether or not the shooting was a sexist act, some even denying the idea outright.
8) Many memorials for the victims have been created, and rightly so; however, some prominent ones were erected in poor neighbourhoods where many Native women were killed every day in the same time period as the shooting (see: Marker of Change, Vancouver) (see: Missing Women, Vancouver). Basically, white feminism happened. 
The entire event was nothing short of a tragedy, and I recommend that everyone read up on it and the resulting aftermath. It’s… interesting to see how the media tried to turn it into a random act of psychopathy instead of what it was (we know better now, luckily). The reactions (memorials, etc) to the deaths of these 14 White, middle class women as compared to the deaths of 60+ Native, lower class women are also “interesting” to compare. (By interesting, I mean infuriating.)

underunderstood:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

This is an important event in history, especially Canadian and feminist history. So I’m going to tell you more about it.

1) The shooter had been rejected from Ecole Polytechnique prior to the shooting. He blamed this on these female students, claiming that they were feminists who ruined his life.

2) In the first classroom he entered, he demanded the men leave before shooting at the women. No man attempted to stop him as they left. Take that as you will. (Later on, several men did get injured trying to stop him in the hallways.)

3) In his suicide letter, he believed that feminists were attempting to be more powerful than men, and were trying to take men’s rights away.
4) Feminists were actually blamed by some for the massacre. The line of logic was “if feminists didn’t make women’s rights an issue, Levine wouldn’t have wanted to kill feminists!” Victim blaming at its finest.

5) The mainstream news media often did not publicize the outrage from women’s groups, and often preferred those who took a calm approach. Ironic, that.

6) Despite him literally having a hit list of feminist icons in his final letter, several newscasters questioned whether or not the shooting was a sexist act, some even denying the idea outright.

8) Many memorials for the victims have been created, and rightly so; however, some prominent ones were erected in poor neighbourhoods where many Native women were killed every day in the same time period as the shooting (see: Marker of Change, Vancouver) (see: Missing Women, Vancouver). Basically, white feminism happened. 

The entire event was nothing short of a tragedy, and I recommend that everyone read up on it and the resulting aftermath. It’s… interesting to see how the media tried to turn it into a random act of psychopathy instead of what it was (we know better now, luckily). The reactions (memorials, etc) to the deaths of these 14 White, middle class women as compared to the deaths of 60+ Native, lower class women are also “interesting” to compare. (By interesting, I mean infuriating.)

(via shacess)

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Far more conspicuous than my father’s religious conviction, was his unhappiness. In my eulogy of him, I described him as “melancholic by nature” and as the word melancholic has a purposefully archaic feel to it, so too do other words that might describe his emotional state. Haunted. Tortured. Tormented. Woven into my earliest memories is the sight of my father, day after day, sitting in our kitchen, an enormous cup of tea steaming by his side, a pipe hanging from his mouth, his head drooped heavy into his hand, looking up to meet my gaze as I approached, rolling his eyes in all too clear pain. Shaken, obviously, by what night had once again delivered unto him.

“I’ve never had a good night’s sleep in my life. I have nightmares, Baby…” He would tremble a little, shudder at the memories. “Nightmares so terrible, I won’t tell you what they are.”

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thisisnotlatino:

s0bernights:

s0bernights:

So this is what I got up to on Friday, best birthday weekend by far :)

getting frequent abuse for this picture haha, like it’s a general stereotype.. every culture is subject to it at some point stop bitching out seriously! Like I’m English, do you see me making a blog dedicated to making an unnecessary fuss out of people wearing top hats and monicals and the stereotype of drinking tea, eating fish and chips and speaking like the queen? ummm no, pipe down.

Awwwwwwwww poor baby I’m sorry did we hurt your feelings? Are you being ‘abused’ kindof how your ancestors destroyed the world and abused all of out ancestors? You know rapists, murderers and colonizers? The sun never sets on the English empire!! And the reason you don’t ‘make a fuss’ about people dressing up as the English is that usually they’re Anglophiles where as here you’re just a racist.

What is it with English people complaining about cultural imperialism? Can they not hear themselves? I’ve seen a lot of this lately.

thisisnotlatino:

s0bernights:

s0bernights:

So this is what I got up to on Friday, best birthday weekend by far :)

getting frequent abuse for this picture haha, like it’s a general stereotype.. every culture is subject to it at some point stop bitching out seriously! Like I’m English, do you see me making a blog dedicated to making an unnecessary fuss out of people wearing top hats and monicals and the stereotype of drinking tea, eating fish and chips and speaking like the queen? ummm no, pipe down.

Awwwwwwwww poor baby I’m sorry did we hurt your feelings? Are you being ‘abused’ kindof how your ancestors destroyed the world and abused all of out ancestors? You know rapists, murderers and colonizers? The sun never sets on the English empire!! And the reason you don’t ‘make a fuss’ about people dressing up as the English is that usually they’re Anglophiles where as here you’re just a racist.

What is it with English people complaining about cultural imperialism? Can they not hear themselves? I’ve seen a lot of this lately.

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streetetiquette:

Thanks for this! 

vuvuonstyle:

Menswear With Tiger | Street Etiquette

Travis Gumbs and Joshua Kissi form the duo Street Etiquette, an entity that sets to showcase style from perspectives that are cultural and historical yet still urban. A project of theirs aptly titled The Black Ivy explored fashion in this cultural and historical context and inspired the college-prep trend that is still visible on the streets. Their extensive traveling has allowed them to effectively produce a founded opinion on menswear and fashion. Vogue Italia hailed the two as single-handedly changing the world’s perception of urban street wear. Both with a very dapper outlook on style, the two have very deep interests in vintage clothing. Their most recent project, Slumflower, is a photo editorial and short film. It looks at tailored silhouettes for men, but more specifically the men from the more urban areas of New York City. The duo aims to discuss social and cultural constructs through the use of clothing and photography. For them, it is not only about fashion, but the types of messages we are able to convey through it.

 Tiger Maremela

Images: www.streetetiquette.com

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charlielikesdragons:

reminder that no one is required to love their parents because a lot of people do have genuinely shitty parents and if you invalidate people’s feelings about their toxic parents i’ll probably punch you in the throat

(via fsufeministalumna)

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atlasobscura:

A Photographer Finds the Ghost of Woodie Guthrie in an Abandoned Asylum

In the legend of folk icon Woody Guthrie, his final 15 years as a hospital patient tormented byHuntington’s Disease are often forgotten. The vibrant musician from Oklahoma boiled over with hundreds of songs of worker empowerment, and odes to the downtrodden burst from his guitar slapped with the words: “This Machine Kills Fascists.” His "This Land Is Your Land" is practically an alternative populist national anthem. Yet his final years are also a part of who he was, even as his mental and physical abilities deteriorated with the degenerative hereditary disease so that he couldn’t even hold a guitar. 

Photographer Phillip Buehler set out to document the abandoned Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital in Morris Plains, New Jersey, where Guthrie was a patient from 1956 to 1961. Buehler has been photographing “modern ruins” for decades, and wanted to document this old 19th century ruined building before it faded from memory. 

For more of Phillip Buehler’s photography of Woody Guthrie’s final years, keep reading on Atlas Obscura… 

(If you find yourself in the NYC area this weekend, Buehler will be at the Va

(via shannibal-cannibal)

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humansofnewyork:

"One day a crazy looking homeless guy came to the door, and we were about to close the door on him, but my mother saw him and shouted: ‘Hey Eugene!’ She knew his name! Then she ran around the kitchen putting all sorts of food into tupperware, and brought it out to him. After he left, we asked my mom why she gave him so much food. She told us: ‘You never know how Jesus is going to look when he shows up.’ She was always saying that— it was a spiritual thing. Then you know what happened? Two months later, that same man showed up on the door step, clean shaven, and wearing a suit. And he had an envelope with money for my mother. ‘Ms. Rosa always believed in me,’ he said. I’ll never forget it! Eugene was his name."

Stories like this are why I still have so much respect for religious folk, even after an upbringing in the most toxic religious atmosphere you can imagine and a decade since I came out as an atheist. Most of the other atheists I know get really eye-rolly at this stuff and talk shit about how the fear of going to hell can motivate people to do all kinds of things (that they’d never do otherwise, some see fit to add), but I don’t hear that in this; instead I hear someone saying they recognize a little piece of divinity in everyone they meet. I don’t call it divine, but I see it too, and I feel fulfilled when I think of my connection to other human beings, even though I don’t call that spiritual. And you know what? I’ve never seen any of those jerks give so much as a dollar to someone in need.

humansofnewyork:

"One day a crazy looking homeless guy came to the door, and we were about to close the door on him, but my mother saw him and shouted: ‘Hey Eugene!’ She knew his name! Then she ran around the kitchen putting all sorts of food into tupperware, and brought it out to him. After he left, we asked my mom why she gave him so much food. She told us: ‘You never know how Jesus is going to look when he shows up.’ She was always saying that— it was a spiritual thing. Then you know what happened? Two months later, that same man showed up on the door step, clean shaven, and wearing a suit. And he had an envelope with money for my mother. ‘Ms. Rosa always believed in me,’ he said. I’ll never forget it! Eugene was his name."

Stories like this are why I still have so much respect for religious folk, even after an upbringing in the most toxic religious atmosphere you can imagine and a decade since I came out as an atheist. Most of the other atheists I know get really eye-rolly at this stuff and talk shit about how the fear of going to hell can motivate people to do all kinds of things (that they’d never do otherwise, some see fit to add), but I don’t hear that in this; instead I hear someone saying they recognize a little piece of divinity in everyone they meet. I don’t call it divine, but I see it too, and I feel fulfilled when I think of my connection to other human beings, even though I don’t call that spiritual. And you know what? I’ve never seen any of those jerks give so much as a dollar to someone in need.

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overlypolitebisexual:

i have a total MANcrush on that guy in those MEggings and the GUYliner that’s eating a MANyogurt and probably washes himself with a MANwasher don’t forget i am a MAN haha total DUDE right here being so MANsecure about my MANsculinity i have to add the word MAN into everything i say to remind you

(via blue-author)